IS BIGGER BETTER?

While we’d certainly argue that when it comes to cars bigger isn’t always better, the wider and longer Optima is now in line with its main competitors delivering added interior space. Rear seat legroom and headroom is plentiful for the second row passengers, although a lower roof section for the middle seat makes it all but useless for anyone but a child. Front seat space isn’t as generous. Even with the seat in its lowest position, taller drivers (those 6-feet and above) who don’t feel the need to drive with the seat half reclined will find it cramped with very little in the way of headroom.

The Optima’s increased dimensions have also benefited trunk space, showing that Kia’s dramatic new design language isn’t at the expense of functionality. The trunk holds a cavernous 15.4 cubic feet, although the pass-through space is quite narrow.

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